Almost £8,000 raised at LED’s 2019 Fundraising Challenge

Our LED Blencathra Fundraising Challenge 2019 page on JustGiving closed earlier this week and the donations total is £5,904.90 plus £1,315.38 gift aid from 96 supporters!

In addition, we have some direct donations of £616 giving a grand total of:

£7836.28

Huge thanks to everyone who participated – walking, feeding, ferrying, donating! It was a great day.

LED’s Blencathra Fundraising Weekend 2019

LED’s Blencathra Fundraising Weekend 2019

To give you an idea of some of the things that this money enables us to do

Our solar lights cost around $55 each for Nepal (which is $45 plus approx $10 import duties) and $25-$38 in Peru (import duty can take the per light cost up to $38).

We try to supply a number of villages per year. Villages can range from 10 lights to well over 25 depending on size. Val mainly focuses on a specific valley or valleys each season in both Nepal and Peru and we’re getting to the stage now where are needing to start re-supplying as some original lights need mending or replacing.

For school supplies, the cost depends on the number of children and what they need, and again the cost varies in Peru and Nepal as we buy the supplies in Huaraz or Kathmandu to help the local economy.

In Quisuar it costs about £450 a year for the primary school and £70 for the secondary school as they generally only need pens and notebooks. When we supply the school in Jancopampa the cost is around £700 as it’s a bigger school. We try to fund supplies for both schools every year.

After the Trustees next Board meeting we’ll have a more detailed list of specific projects in mind for next year. Watch this space!

For updates on our projects, fundraising, treks and other activities, follow LED on Facebook/LEDCharity and Twitter/LEDCharity.

Donations always welcome via our LED JustGiving page.

Join us for LED’s Blencathra Fundraising Challenge 2019

Join Val and friends for a day in the hills raising money for our work in Nepal and Peru.

This year’s LED Fundraising Event will be held on Saturday 18th May and we’ll be based in the village of Mungrisdale, in the northern fells of the Lake District.

We are collecting donations, sponsorship and registration payments via our page on Just Giving: LED Blencathra Fundraising Challenge 2019.

When

Saturday 18th May 2019.

What

A 16 mile hike over Blencathra, one of the Lake District’s most beautiful mountains (a shorter walk has been planned for those who prefer) with an optional evening dinner.

Where

The start and finish will be at Near Howe just outside the village of Mungrisdale (Grid Reference 373288). We will advise of where to park, if not at Near Howe, closer to the event. We will be registering walkers at Near Howe on the day (we will signpost this).

The maps covering the route are OS Explorer Map OL5 The English Lakes: North-Eastern Area (Penrith, Patterdale & Caldbeck) (1:25,000) and Landranger 90 Penrith & Keswick (1:50,000).

Cost

  • £20 per person
  • An additional £25 per person if you would like to join us for dinner after the event (this will include food and some drinks). We have enough capacity for around 50 people (please indicate on the registration form if you want to attend the dinner).

Restrictions

For this Challenge all walkers MUST be over 14. If you are under the age of 16 your parent or legal guardian must complete the “Under 16s” details on the registration form and you must be accompanied by your parent or legal guardian at all times.

Further Information & Registration

For further information and the registration form, email Mike Smith at mikejsmith563@gmail.com.

Registration will close 5pm on Friday 3rd May 2019.

Our Medical Elective in Quisuar, Peru

In August 2018, Leeds medics Rachel, Alice, Heather and Katie spent their medical elective period at the LED Health Post in Quisuar, in Peru’s Cordillera Blanca. During their four weeks they also ran mobile clinics in surrounding villages, delivering school supplies en route. Here’s their report.

Elective Report

Over the summer of 2018 we as four 4th year medical students spent our medical elective period at the health post in Quishuar, a remote village situated in the Cordillera Blanca mountain region of Peru. The team consisted of ourselves, Tula a permanent nurse at the post and Juan, an interpreter and guide. The health post aims to provide basic healthcare to the 75 families of Quishuar and sometimes to surrounding villages at a reasonable cost of 5 soles per consultation. We aimed to contribute to the running of the health post, promote health education and also teach English to the local children.

Fundraising

Before departing for Quishuar, we raised funds to allow us to purchase some resources to contribute as well as donate to the charity that is responsible for building and supporting the sustainability of the post, Light Education Development (LED). LED aims to provide sustainable solar lighting, basic education and fundamental healthcare to remote communities in the developing world. We were inspired to start this following the walk to Dufton Pike in May 2018 where we met many of the people involved with the charity. We thoroughly enjoyed the day and saw first hand the commitment to the cause from so many people which was inspiring.

What makes Quishuar unique?

We found the Quishuar population had an inflated view of medical management, almost always preferring tablets over conservative or surgical management. We thought this may be due to a combination of lack of education surrounding common health problems and accessibility to alternative means of treatment, being so far away from a hospital (12 hours by car and significant expense) or other supportive services.

In terms of clinical practice, there were several differences to note that became apparent whilst working alongside Tula. This was most obvious with regards to the management of infections; we would often think that antibiotics were unnecessary, but it seemed the norm to readily give out antibiotics even when there was little evidence of infection. This was difficult to negotiate at times due to differing opinions as to what the problem was as well as the language barrier. Our antibiotic stewardship awareness is evident as we were much more cautious, however this may be less appropriate within a community where antibiotics are not so readily available and therefore resistance is far less likely.

Furthermore, there was an issue with non-returning for follow-up. It was unclear as to the main reasons for this, but we found that the knowledge that people are unlikely to return resulted in a change in our management, often distributing more medications at once and giving more long-term explanations of advice in order to pre-empt this problem.

Common presentations

One of the main problems was chronic dehydration, commonly manifesting as headaches and in many women, “urinary tract infection” symptoms. When asked, most people reported drinking only a glass or two of water a day and there was little understanding of the relationship between poor hydration and kidney problems/headaches. We tried to make the most of this situation, taking the time to explain this to patients during consultations. The language barrier made this challenging at times, with the level of patient understanding difficult to gauge but we got into a habit of asking every patient about drinking habits and advising them to drink 2L of water per day.

Giardia and worms were the two most common gastrointestinal presentations seen; often entire families came in with the same symptoms. We had a low threshold for treating these conditions as we had been advised they were common and recurrent, and quickly treated with a short course of medication. Hand hygiene was an important topic to raise here, as most people worked in agriculture and kept animals in and around the house, a major source of these infections.

A condition that we found particularly shocking was “pterygium” an ocular condition caused by sun damage. Therefore, one of our main education drives was sun protection; encouraging people to wear their hats low over their face and to purchase sunglasses if they could. A recommendation for future groups would be to collect sunglasses and provide them to the community to provide protection to as many people as possible.

Additionally, we saw several people with permanently scarred corneas as a result of untreated corneal ulcers. A case that was particularly upsetting was a young man who presented with a frank cornel scar, hoping for his longstanding blindness to be cured. His expectations were so far removed from what was possible making it a difficult conversation to have, especially as he was insistent on receiving medications to cure his condition. The frustration was only heightened due to the preventability of his condition. Whilst a corneal transplant was discussed (the only curative treatment here), it would never be possible for this patient to explore the options due to his financial position which was difficult to accept having only experienced the free services offered by the NHS in the UK.

Education

During our time, we had the opportunity to teach local children English in our afternoons. These sessions were well attended and we worked through different themes such as: weather, food and sports. The children were enthusiastic to learn and a joy to teach. Some would travel from neighbouring villages and all would work hard – even after a full day at their schools! On our last day we organised a mini-Olympics which was well received and got every child equally involved as they practiced their English through team sports. All the work that the children completed was handed out to them with a certificate, which we hope will keep them motivated to continue to work hard. We also taught about health education, the key topics being sanitation, signs of infection and when a doctor is required. We believe that this along with the water advice is invaluable to the community and it was great to take the opportunity to organise this. Another session we managed to organise was sex education with 20 attendees, aged between 14-17. This session was held with the help of Juan and lots of questions were asked at the end, demonstrating the engagement and interest in the topic. We hope there is scope for it to become a yearly event to help tackle high rates of teenage pregnancy and STIs. Our

Reflections

We can safely say that this was a unique and unforgettable experience on so many levels; both from a medical and personal perspective. From our dancing welcome party to our first taste of guinea pig we had so many new experiences in such a different environment and we all felt that we improved our medical skills as well as our Spanish speaking skills. The health post is evidently a very highly regarded epicentre in the village that contributes not only medically but also socially to the people of Quishuar.

A few highlights

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Interested in volunteering with us in Peru or Nepal? Use the Contact LED form on www.lighteducationdevelopment.org or message us on facebook.com/LEDCharity to find out about opportunities in 2019.

Over £6,000 raised at this year’s LED Fundraising Weekend

Our Dufton Pike and High Cup Nick fundraising weekend raised well over £6,000, which will be a huge help to LED’s projects in Nepal and Peru, purchasing and distributing new solar lights as well as helping our health centres and local schools.

Thank you to all who supported and/ or came along for a great weekend on 12/13 May and an amazing fundraising effort. We were blessed with great weather and a brilliant time was had by all on the hike over Dufton Pike and High Cup Nick, and at the evening festivities.

Special thanks go to Liam and Sue at www.fellsidecottages.uk in Dufton for hosting the event and all of their organisational support, and wonderful puddings after dinner!

Also a huge shout out for the food and drink in the evening, provided by Helen and Mark Hunt, Denise Brown and the trustees of LED. Jan at the Wakemans House Cafe in Ripon made some excellent scones which we all enjoyed after the walk, and Reunion Ales from Twickenham, West London provided some exceptional ale for the evening.

Thanks again from Val and the LED team for the support through sponsorship, buying raffle tickets, lending organisational help, coming along and making the event so special.

For updates on our projects, fundraising, treks and other activities, follow LED on Facebook/LEDCharity and Twitter/LEDCharity.

Donations always welcome via our LED JustGiving page.